Piazza del Popolo, Rome

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Piazza del Popolo

One of the most spectacular sites in Rome, the Piazza del Popolo has its fair share of history in a city renowned for its past. The crowning jewel of this stunning landmark is the Obelisk of Rameses II, which was brought to Rome after the conquest of Egypt and moved to the Piazza during the 16th century by Pope Sixtus V. Other popular tourist destinations in the Piazza are a trio of churches: the Santa Maria del Popolo, Santa Maria dei Miracoli and Santa Maria di Montesanto, which together contain artistic treasures created by the likes of Raphael, Bernini, Carvaggio and other Renaissance greats. This popular square is a place where people come together to celebrate events such as New Year’s Eve and various festivals. In fact, translated “Piazza del Popolo” means “Plaza of the People”.

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Kapunda, South Australia

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Nestled in the southwestern area of the state of South Australia, lies the town of Kapunda. The town was founded after two men who ran sheep in the area discovered copper ore in 1842. The two bought 80 acres of land around the discovery and set to work mining the copper. Fine marble was also quarried from nearby areas adding to the town’s wealth. The marble quarried from Kapunda was used to face the Parliament House in Adelaide. With the copper veins tapped out, Kapunda’s main industry are cereal grains and the area also contributes to the wine-growing industry.
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Tolomato Cemetery, St. Augustine

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You say Tolomato, I say Tolomato!

Tolomato Cemetery received its fun name from the Native American village upon which it was built.  These Native Americans were a small group of the Guale tribe who had converted to Catholicism and lived in Tolomato village with Franciscan monks who had established a mission there.
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