Fort Mifflin

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I’m one of the people who fall into the category of People/Ghosts Haunt the Place of Their Death or A Place Important in Their Lives. Therefore, I do not believe cemeteries are haunted.  If people/ghosts haunt places of death, it stands to reason that a battlefield or other military installation would be high on the list of ‘most haunted’ places on Earth by sheer volume of potential individual entities lingering. So much pain and suffering, not only by those whose lives were abruptly ended in the name of something greater, but also those left behind.
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American Murder House: The Morris-Jumel Mansion – New York City, NY

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Morris-Jumel MansionWas he pushed?  Was it murder? Was it coincidence that after his death his wife became one of the richest women in New York City?  The mysterious death of Stephen Jumel has caused whispers and rumors through three centuries, but no one living really knows the truth.  What is said about Stephen and his wife Eliza is sordid enough for a modern day soap opera…imagine what post-revolution society may have thought and said about them if even half the claims were true! Continue reading

American Murder House: General Wayne Inn – Merion Station, PA

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Historic photo of the General Wayne Inn.

The General Wayne Inn was opened in 1704 and operated under various names, such as the William Penn Inn, the Wayside Inn and Streepers Tavern, before being renamed in 1793 in honor of General “Mad” Anthony Wayne, a local Revolutionary War and Indian War hero. Mad Anthony wasn’t the only Revolutionary War celebrity who had stayed or dined in the Inn.  George Washington and the Marquis de Lafayette also supped there during the war. But the General Wayne Inn wasn’t just a restaurant and inn, it also served as a post office, a general store and a coach stop for many, many years. Continue reading

Endview Plantation

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After watching Larry the Cable Guy make a complete ass of himself on a recent episode of Only in America with Larry the Cable Guy titled ‘America After Dark’ by joining a paranormal investigation of a Virginia plantation, I decided to find and share the story behind the plantation visited.

Enter Endview Plantation, built in 1769, which began life as Harwood Plantation, built by William Harwood. Built in the Georgian style of architecture, the house sits on what was once the Great Warwick Road (now Virginia State Route 238) which connected the colonial capital of Williamsburg to the town of Hampton. The house sits atop a small knoll with a spring at the base and is surrounded by prime farm land. The abundance of fresh game and water attracted local Native American tribes (Powhatan Confederation) for 1,200 years prior to the settlement at Jamestown.

During the Revolutionary War, Endview was a resting place for General Thomas Nelson, Jr‘s troops heading for Yorktown. Though we don’t know what use it had during the War of 1812, there is evidence the home was put to military use again then. During the Peninsula Campaign of the Civil War, the plantation was used as a hospital, being owned at the time by Dr Humphrey Harwood Curtis, Jr, one of two doctors in the area.

Today, Endview Plantation is owned by the City of Newport News and is home to “The Civil War at Endview: A Living History Museum”. Military reenactments also take place on the property, including those honouring the 225th anniversary of the Seige of Yorktown.

Paranormal enthusiasts believe that the plantation house is haunted by General Magruder. A woman, believed to be Dr Curtis’ wife Mariah, has also been seen crossing the road toward the house during the reenactments. The curtains in a former nursery open on their own after being closed for the night and a fireplace mantle in one downstairs room has carvings on it from the wounded soldiers which gives people an uneasy feeling when they get too close. And of course the plantation graveyard is full of activity as well.
 

 

 

Endview Plantation (Wikipedia)
Endview Plantation
Greater Williamsburg Chamber & Tourist Alliance
Stories Behind VA’s Haunts

Haunted Long Island: The Milleridge Inn

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The Milleridge Inn: Jericho, NY

The Milleridge Inn in Jericho is one of Long Island’s most picturesque restaurants.  The original part of the restaurant was built as a two room house back in 1672 by the Willets, a Quaker family. The house grew along with Long Island. It was used to quarter Hessian and British soldiers prior to (and perhaps during) the Revolutionary War.  The home witnessed the winds of war and the onset of independence.

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Cemetery Series: Sleepy Hollow Cemetery – Concord, MA

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Besides having one of the coolest sounding names in the cemetery industry, Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Concord, Massachusetts has some of the most illustrious inhabitants in the country. Although a number of these illustrious inhabitants are famous American writers, they do not include Washington Irving, so suffice to say that this Sleepy Hollow has nothing to do with a famous horseman of legend.
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