John Ringo Grave

John Ringo Historic Site Monument

The Historic Site Monument at the Ringo Gravesite.

If you’ve read about the untamed American frontier and have never heard of Tombstone, Arizona, for shame! This little town is a great place to learn about frontier life in a mining boom town. Tombstone is rife with legends and stories that would keep anyone interested for weeks on end. It was a silver mining town known for its rough-around-the-edges citizens. Names like Wyatt Earp, Curly Bill Brocius, Big Nose Kate, Doc Holliday– are a dime a dozen in the annals of Tombstone history. Tombstone is noted for the longest poker game in history (8 years, 5 months, and 3 days) and the infamous gunfight at the O.K. corral which was primarily between the Earps and the Clantons and McLowerys.

Part of the culture of the “Wild West” was to bury a body along the trail where the person passed away. There was no transporting the body anywhere unless the deceased was close to the rail lines at their time of death. Decomposition was rapid because food didn’t have preservatives and embalming was still in its infancy. Bodies still relatively intact that were found on the trail were buried deep enough to keep the coyotes, vultures or other desert scavengers at bay. Most makeshift graves were covered with rocks and marked with a simple wooden cross near the place the body was found and buried. The practice of leaving a cross or headstone is still observed in parts of the American southwest– though, the bodies are typically transported and interred in an actual cemetery instead of beside the road.

One such body that was found and buried on the trail is the source of much historical intrigue as there is some disagreement over the death of this man whose personal legend is linked to the infamous “Town Too Tough to Die”– Tombstone, Arizona. The body of John Peters Ringo is interred near the oak tree where he was found. A coroner’s inquest was held to determine his cause of death, but not everyone agrees with the verdict. Continue reading

Haunted Long Island: Winfield Estate

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Winfield Hall - Glen Cove, NY

Long Island is unparalleled when it comes to gilded mansions of the Roaring Twenties. Tycoons with renowned names like J.P. Morgan, Vanderbilt and DuPont all built their “play palaces” there…it was the height of convenience.  The businessmen would spend the week working in New York City, while their wives and children enjoyed the estate life.  The men would join their families on the weekend. Lavish parties were commonplace as the millionaires all tried to outdo one another.

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A Korean Ghost Story

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Because it gets so much traffic, I’ve decided to clean this post up a bit– this includes editing the grammar of the translation as well as updating some of the history of the “webtoon”.

Back on August 8, 2011, my co-worker linked me to an illustrated (and animated) “webtoon” of a Korean ghost story. My co-worker copy/pasted an English translation he found on the web. I thought I’d share here since it’s befitting of our blog. Later, it looked like the author went back in and put the English translation in the toon. Links to both of those can be found below.

Since it’s debut, the “Bong-Cheon-Dong Ghost” story has been an internet sensation. Most of the links we get to our blog involve this story and people who are searching for the English translation of the story. Others have recorded YouTube videos of themselves and friends and family reading the story. The reactions are great!

I really hope the original artist/programmer puts together another spooky webtoon for us all to enjoy!

Story link (in the original Korean):
http://comic.naver.com/webtoon/detail.nhn?titleId=350217&no=20&weekday=tue

Link to the English Translation:
http://comic.naver.com/webtoon/detail.nhn?titleId=350217&no=31&weekday=tue

Below is the translation with minor revisions. (Updated 10 June 2013)
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St. James Palace

St. James Palace - Changing Guard1

Palace Guards begin the changing of the guard at St. James Palace.

The screams for help rang out in the early morning hours of May 31st, 1810. It was 2:30 A.M. and the Duke of Cumberland, Ernest Augustus, brother to George IV and William IV was attacked as he slept. The sharp blade of the assailant slashed and hacked through the Duke’s padded nightgown waking him from blissful slumber. The Duke deflected many of the blows with his hands and wrists as he fought off his attacker while crying for help. Cornelius Neale, a valet to the Duke, responded to his pleas for help. By the time he arrived, the assailant had fled leaving the Duke’s bloodstained saber lying on the floor by the door.
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The Lemp Mansion

Unarguably, Anheuser-Busch put St Louis, Missouri on the map, so to speak, when it advertised the city as its home. It’s no surprise, then, that St Louis is the home to the first brewing company in the United States: Lemp Brewing. It is also home to the largest mercantile mystery the city has ever experienced which has led to Lemp Mansion being considered one of the most haunted homes in America.

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Ghosts of Ireland: Spring Hill

Besides being the name of a treacherously boring town in Central Florida, Spring Hill is the name of a historic home in County Londonderry, Ireland. The house was built in the late 1600’s as a result of a marriage contract between William Conyngham and Ann Upton.  Her father had a clause written into the contract stating that her husband must build her a “convenient dwelling house of lime and stone, two stories high with the necessary office houses, gardens and orchards.” This is historic proof that fathers have for centuries been looking after the best interests of their daughters.

Spring Hill

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Haunted Lodgings: Hotel San Carlos

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Hotel San Carlos

Located in the heart of downtown Phoenix, Arizona at 202 North Central Avenue, is where you’ll find Hotel San Carlos, Phoenix’s original boutique hotel. Designed by architect George Witecross Ritchie in an Italian Renaissance Revival Style, the Hotel San Carlos brings a touch of nostalgia to the Copper Square District of today’s more modern downtown Phoenix. The building was constructed in 1927 and held its grand opening on March 20, 1928. When it was built, it was the first hotel in Phoenix to offer chilled air, and it also had the first elevator in Phoenix. The seven story building, then the tallest building in Phoenix, dominated the downtown skyline. Not two months after opening day, the building’s height would make the new Hotel San Carlos the location of a tragic event.
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